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Tag Archives: visualization

Travelogue 3- Wired aesthetics.

Guys! There’s so much artwork taking on new media… I want to research one good project that throws some light in how the combination between art and new media is shaping new aesthetic trends.

Please help me choose AND broaden the dimension for live reporting. Any ideas are much appreciated.

1. EyeWriter

This project is mainly conducted by Zach Lieberman, NYC based artist and teacher at Parsons. About him: “His work uses technology in a playful and enigmatic way to explore the nature of communication and the delicate boundary between the visible and the invisible. He creates performances, installations, and on-line works that investigate gestural input, augmentation of the body, and kinetic response.”

Temptone graffiti, pre paralysis

He has an amazing project called EyeWriterhe co-designed an eye-tracking system to help a graffiti artist and friend of his, Tony Quan (aka Temptone) who has paralysis resulting from sclerosis, to draw using only his eyes. Late last year, artists from around the world met to develop the (low-cost, open-source) software and tools to that enabled Temptone to draw his tag again after more than 5 years.

Check it out:

Phase 2 of the EyeWriter project began last August. The long-term goal is to create a professional/social network of software developers, hardware hackers, urban projection artist and ALS patients from around the world who are using local materials and open source research to creatively connect and make eye art.

My travelogue would consist on further research on EyeWriter—what is going on right now? how has the project evolved? I would, of course, try to contact Zack Lieberman. I know that the Parsons Communication, Technology + Design program is involved in the project, so the idea would be to establish a link and do fieldwork .

2. DRAWN- an installation for hands and ink

ANOTHER great project by Zack Lieberman (yes, I’m becoming obsessed). This project presents a scenario in which painted ink forms appear to come to life, rising off the page and interacting with the hands that drew them. How it works: “custom-developed software alters a video signal in real time, creating a seamless, organic and even magical world of spontaneous and improvised performance of hand and ink.” In the installation, visitors are invited to become performers themselves, learning how to utilize the system in order paint and then tap, nudge and poke the ink across the paper.

Take a look:

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I would like to know where is the installation now, how has the project developed? How has it influenced other new media artists? What are the limitations of the medium? How does it allow the artist from an aesthetic perspective? If it is open source, who else has worked on it, and how have they used it?

3. Real-time data visualizations

There are a lot of art projects that fuel on data provided in real time by internet users- many of them are based on Twitter feeds because it’s a reliable source of real-time info feed. The visualizations have taken different aesthetic forms that we’ve all seen- cloudlike formations,  rhizomes, grids, etc,  and artists are generating new graphics and visual representations. I would like to further explore this. What does real-time data allow the artist to do from an aesthetic perspective? Is there something about the real time nature of data that creates or hints new visual standards? Where do we see these types of visualizations entering spaces beyond the computer screen? Are they influencing back more traditional artforms?

I’d like to base my travelogue on the project TweetCatcha, by Bruce Drummonds – new media artist, designer, coder and musician currently studying an MFA in Design and Technlogy at Parsons. TweetCatcha seeks to uncover the organic nature of news as it travels through Twitter over time, by examining the movement of NY Times articles through Twitter.

Anyway, any feedback is much appreciated– especially on how to keep it LIVE (as in real time).

thanks!

How can digital media collaborate in delivering the Arts?

High art should not lower down and mess up with technology: the purists would faint at the mere thought! What, Mozart in YouTube? Picasso’s profile on Facebook? The Metropolitan Opera leaving its sacred marble temple to show in movie theaters across the globe? Oops. I guess that’s been done!

How can the new media collaborate with cultural organizations in general to help them reach larger audiences and breach geographical and cultural divides, within a limited budget?

New digital media allows us to do what we never thought we could: shorten distances, experience several situations at a time, and participate in events that take place miles away. I haven’t found it yet, but I am sure that someone out there is using 360º cameras, live streaming, interactive mapping or HD television to blow up the possibilities of a great event, art exhibit or local tradition. I want to find out what is going on, but here’s the catch: I want to see if it can work in a country that is not completely wired and over-connected. The Met and the National Theatre have figured it out, but there must be affordable ways of mixing culture and new media.

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Catching up with the XXI Century- culture and the Web

Hi, everyone. I am happy to join this conversation as the newest addition to this Topics in Digital Media class– Quick presentation: My name is Jimena Lara, second-semester MCC student from Mexico City. My general background is in Communication and Cultural Public Policy. I’ve been working in different areas of Mexico’s Ministry of Culture for the past few years: mainly in cultural project development in general, grants and scholarships for the arts; and marketing for the performing arts.

My experience there has shown me how technology’s role within the Arts has become increasingly important; both as means and platforms for creation, and as a priceless tool for marketing, communication and cultural advocacy– especially in a country with such diverse cultural needs as Mexico.

I would like my first plunge into digital travel to go down this path. I believe that there are awesome possibilities of making arts organizations and new media join in an amazing, firework-deserving, explosive relationship. Some of the issues that I’d like to explore are:

1.  Outreach–

Unlike the United States, cultural policy in Mexico is mainly a governmental issue. The majority of the cultural institutions and the education and cultural policies are under the control of the Federal and Local Governments through the National Council for Culture and the Arts; and the vast majority of cultural institutions (all of the archeological sites and most of the museums and concert halls, as well as the main orchestras, dance and theatre companies, etc.) are financed with public funds.

Therefore, it is a primary objective and responsibility to make culture and the Arts as accessible as possible for the whole country. This means reaching an extremely  diverse population (both socially and economically) with, of course, a very limited (actually, shrinking) budget. The sizzling urban centers might be bustling with theater, film and museums, but also the small rural towns in the middle of the mountains, the jungle or the desert need to be taken into account and their own cultural expressions to find a spot in the national stage.

How can digital media help to establish a true cultural dialogue between urban and rural? What possibilities does it offer for crossing the multi-language barrier in a country with 62 indigenous tongues? In the world of streaming and 360º cameras, distance should be a much lesser problem, right?

2. New audience formation–

In order to survive, any cultural institution needs to keep reaching for different segments of the population and engage new audiences in its offers. Digital media can prove to offer amazing tools to interest the younger generations, as well as other alternative, highly politicized or underground communities.

3. Digital marketing and publicity–

I can’t say if it’s a wider phenomenon, but least in Mexico the tendency of cultural organizations (both public, private and non-for-profit) is to focus their advertising and marketing efforts mostly on the media that they have known for so long: newspapers, magazines, radio, TV, flyers, posters, and billboards. In my experience, the older and more ‘respectable’ the institution is, the more it doubts the effectiveness of digital alternatives of advertising. Furthermore, they seem to tremble at the mere thought of opening their websites to the uncontrollable world of social media (“but what if someone criticizes us and everybody reads it?”). Although traditional media does give positive results, there is no questioning the impact of digital media and, particularly, social networking as a faster, much cheaper means of publicity and circulation. I’d like to further explore the communication strategies that have worked for local art institutions.

4. Networking–

How can public, private and non-for-profit cultural institutions make the most of digital networking? Strong connections are essential for funding, idea exchange, joint advertising, and other forms of cross-pollination. Even more than institutions, independent artists and collectives can benefit enormously from joining systems, lists, and other collectives to show and even commercialize their work– like this cool project from hitRECORD.org Still, in the ever-growing sea of options that is the Web, it’s hard for smaller actors to gain visibility. What are the best strategies for this?

Anyway, I know I need to narrow this down a lot and set a clearer path to travel or I might end up walking in circles–and without a GoogleMap, of course.