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New Media and The Digital Natives – Reading Summary

Born Digital – John Palfrey

If you have any interest in Digital Natives – this 1 hour talk is very informative about what a digital native is, and the godfather of this topic, John Palfrey goes into great detail on his definition and how this generation will change the nature of how we see the internet in the future. It is a population of young people who are will impact they we think, work, and function on a day to day basis.

The Digital Natives are a group of people who are comfortable with sharing their daily lives on the net (ie flick, twitter, facebook) and were exposed to these technologies at a very young age. This population is typically born after 1980, have never known life without a computer, TV without a remote control, and never dialed on a rotary phone (not true since I was born after 1980!).

Presentation by John Palfrey – “As part of the Google D.C. Talks series, and in partnership with Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society, Professor John Palfrey offers a sociological portrait of “digital natives” — children who were born into and raised in the digital world — with a particular focus on their conceptions of online privacy.”

There are a few points he clarifies in this video  -

  • This is a POPULATION, not a GENERATION
  • Born after 1980 – because this is when the advent of technology began
  • They have access to these technologies
  • 1 billion who have access (number is low due to digital divide)
  • This is not a DUMMY generation – they are very tech savvy.
  • Young people are INTERACTING, but in a different way – remixed, made in a different way.
  • We must teach digital media literacy

We are Digital Natives – Barrett Lyon

“A new class of person has emerged in the online world: Digital Natives. While living in San Francisco, I also live on the Internet. The Internet is now a place: a two dimensional world that has transcended the web; there is no government, and the citizens are Digital Natives.”

Lyon’s main point is that people are no longer citizens of the United States, or France, but also citizens of the internet. There are specialized groups within these digital natives such as game players, hackers, developers, and the social etiquette that is involved is much different than the physical reality we live in.

Some people choose to define themselves by the activities they take part in on the web – such as social online movements – ie Green Movement, Tea/Coffee Party, which are branches from physical political movements, but these started on the net.

“This scares the crap out of Governments all over the world, because they are ill prepared to deal with these situations. To government regimes that are comfortable asserting their control, this concept is terrifying. How do they counteract the changes online and the movements? Do they need to change their politics, defense, propaganda, and warfare?”

This statement displays that some of these online movements do have an affect on how governments think about the web. Many countries have harsh restrictions on what their citizens can view on the net, ie China, Iran, etc.

The Future of The Internet and How to Stop it – Jonathan Zittrain – Short Summary

This title is actually a book that JZ has wrote which is actually available on amazon if anyone would like to purchase. His main point is that collaboration is key in the survival of a productive internet and cites wikipedia as the main example. The first generation of products that have spear headed the internet have been Tivo, Ipods, and Xboxes, which are tethered appliances, meaning they are using net as their connection to their content/databases.

“The Internet’s current trajectory is one of lost opportunity. Its salvation, Zittrain argues, lies in the hands of its millions of users. Drawing on generative technologies like Wikipedia that have so far survived their own successes, this book shows how to develop new technologies and social structures that allow users to work creatively and collaboratively, participate in solutions, and become true ‘netizens.’

Concluding post: What makes people collaborate online?

The answer is: a mixture of circumstances. Some of them we can’t control, but in general what the leader of the project does or doesn’t, either helps or complicates the process of online collaboration. The key element? Planning.

During the past 3 weeks, I tried to get people to share pictures of interesting situations they encountered in the subway. I tried with a web page, a Facebook Fan page, and a Twitter account. What I got was collaboration from my own social network—friends, or friends of friends submitted some stuff, but always with a short-spanned interest. The next attempt was to tap directly on audiences already interested in the subject—Flickr groups that shared subway pictures. I also added the competition factor—first, the prize was only about prestige: getting voted as the best picture. Then, I finally got an online photography blog interested in publishing the winner picture on their site.

I hoped that would spark interest a bit more, but the fact is that the new collaborations continued to spring from my previous social network and its subsequent effects. That is, when I launched the contest, I got more response from my original Facebook group (which had grown from my own contacts and the “work” I’d previously done on that platform) than from my call for Flickr collaboration. Even though I tapped on the communities that were already interested in the topic (three groups focused on underground transportation photography) and got “professionals” involved by getting them to publish the winning picture on their sites, my guess is that the Flickr group didn’t find enough reasons to take me seriously: I’d never been an active participant in Flickr before, all of my photos are uploaded on Facebook, and I’ve previously “worked” that audience much more.

What did this experience bring? A lot of learning. Not just based on my own travelogue, but I tried to learn from Leslie’s excellent results what had worked in her case as well.

I’d like to share my findings in this video:

YouTube Preview Image

As sidenotes:

Even though the contest wasn’t successful, I did receive some great pictures, and I’d like to share with you the most popular:

metro zocalo

Author: Davii Rangda.  Caption: A night before the “Day of the Dead” in Mexico City.

I will submit the picture to http://lagiraffe.com/, the site that was most interested in publishing the contest pictures.

Special thanks to Leslie for her help and sharing.

The digital afterlife: what happens in social media when we die? Part III

The last podcast of my travelogue explores how social media influence the mourning process. Two psychologists, Jennifer Boni and Arturo Peon, give insights into the experience of grief.  Is it better to maintain the profile of a deceased person, or should it be taken down? How does technology affect the construction of  personal and collective memory?

Although Facebook’s memorial profiles  can facilitate the mourning process, they can also be the source of profound dismay. Security loop holes make the system vulnerable to hoaxes, and add to the grief of the people left behind.

Grafiti-memorial in Montevideo, Uruguay (photo taken by Arturo Peon Barriga). "Sergio Silveira used to fish and teach here. Today he is no more. If you wish to use this place, do it in dignity. Daddy forever."

[podcast]http://blip.tv/file/get/Nw546-TheDigitalAfterlifeWhatHappensInSocialMediaWhenWeDieP948.mp3[/podcast]

Further resources:

More on grief cycle and mourning stages.

Facebook blog: Memories of Friends Departed Endure on Facebook

Jose van Dijk, Mediated Memories in the Digital Age

Online collaboration–pre-conclusion.

YouTube Preview Image

Sorry about this temporary conclusion. In the end, the project finally started to give some results, but very slolwly. There’s a lot to learn from that, too (I know there was a reason). I will definitely post my conclusion, but I thought I needed to wait a bit more and see if I could reach the final stage or not. Thanks, guys.

what makes people collaborate online?

YouTube Preview Image

* Images by the members of Found in the Subway Facebook Fan Page, Raph Koster website, Aaron Alamo, Adarian Herschel, and Flickr groups participants.

The digital afterlife: what happens in social media when we die? Part II

This second podcast explores how physical death is experienced in social media. Three people, three stories; each of them reveals how complex and diverse identity has become online- even in the afterlife. What happened to the profiles of the friends they lost? What do they represent to them? Are there clashes between the digital and the physical world?

Do social media become a way of staying immortal?

[podcast]http://ia331225.us.archive.org/3/items/DeathAndSocialMedia-HowDoPeopleExperienceTheDeathOfAPersonOnline/Death_socialmedia_part2.mp3[/podcast]

Jimena, Harris, and Ryan, thank you so much for sharing your thoughts with me, and let me integrate them into my podcast. I appreciate it very much.
Creative Commons License
The digital afterlife: what happens in social media when we die? Part II by Nadine Wolf is licensed under a Creative Commons Reconocimiento-No comercial-Compartir bajo la misma licencia 3.0 Estados Unidos License.

Micah Sifry Updates “Social Networking, New Governing”

This was his e-mail back to me (as I reminder I had forwarded him Juliette’s question about whether or not a year has changed whether or not Facebook was issuing a new kind of governing).

So here’s his response (short and sweet).

Elizabeth,

Sorry for the delay in getting back to you. The more I thought about it the more I don’t think there’s much to update on to be honest. I can pretty much sum up how I feel about it in one line:

Facebook is still a Truman Show style democracy.

You can quote me on it.

Micah

The digital afterlife: what happens in social media when we die? Part I

As I laid out in the introduction of my travelogue, I will explore various aspects of death and social media. How is death experienced in our digital age? How does it affect the mourning process? And what new rituals emerge? But first of all, I will explain what policies exist for the digital afterlife in social media. Can family members or friends access the account of a deceased person? Should you put logins and passwords in your  will? As our lives and belongings become part of the Internet, death poses particular challenges to our legacy.

Click on the image to listen to the podcast

[podcast]http://blip.tv/file/get/Nw546-DeathAndSocialMediaWhatHappensToYourProfileWhenYouDie694.mp3[/podcast]

For further information:

Post-mortem policies of social networks:

Facebook: if you’d like to report the death of a loved person, this is the contact form, for general information consult What happens (online) when we die: Facebook
Google Buzz: Accessing a deceased person’s mail
Twitter: What happens (online) when we die: Twitter
MySpace: How can you delete or access a deceased user’s profile?

Companies that can take care of your digital legacy:
AssetLock
LegacyLocker
DeathSwitch

About your digital assets:
FarmVille and SecondLife and how virtual estates lead to real-word headaches

Other resources

The Digital Beyond

Death and social media

This podcast explores the topic of death and social media. How do we experience the physical death of a friend online? What implications does it have on the mourning process? Do social networks amplify or assuage the experience of loosing a loved person? Death and social media introduction

[podcast]http://cultureandcommunication.org/tdm/s10/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/Travelogue_Death_MP3.mp3[/podcast]

The Tea Party Movement! – Concluding Post

Hello, this is Honieh your special Tea Party Correspondant bringing to you the latest earl grey, green tea news of the day! Jk.

What EXACTLY is the Tea Party?

Here is a quick summary on their founding values that you can fight on their site – I have shortened them a bit (they are pretty patriotic)

  • Fiscal Responsibility: Fiscal Responsibility by government honors and respects the freedom of the individual to spend the money that is the fruit of their own labor.
  • Constitutionally Limited Government: We, the members of The Tea Party Patriots, are inspired by our founding documents and regard the Constitution of the United States to be the supreme law of the land.
  • Free Markets: A free market is the economic consequence of personal liberty. The founders believed that personal and economic freedom were indivisible, as do we.

From what I’ve learned so far, the Tea Party, wants to revert back to the core values in the American Constitution. One of the main issues the Tea Party has been avidly against is the bailout of banks by the US government and the intertwining of governments and markets.

Composition:

  • What has made this group unique is the their use of technology in promoting their cause. They have using mostly, Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, and Blogs and also Fox News which has been the only television network that has reported this cause the most.
  • They are a grass roots movement, so most of there collaborating is done online and through viral marketing.

3 MAIN MEDIUMS/NORMS:

  • Facebook -The Tea Party Patriots Page has over 96,000 fans alone.
  • Twitter – Tea Party Patriots – 1200 followers
  • YouTube – TPP Channel – 204 Subscribers

What does this all mean?

I have take one small faction of the Tea Party Movement, the Tea Party Patriots, joined their ranks an looked over the mediums they are using? Now why would they take this route? Maybe they are taking a page out of Obama’s book by starting with something that doesn’t require main stream media to endorse.

The new media age enables users to collaborate. The Power Theory that Benkler discusses also is a good example of how these users are interacting. One person sends out a thread to a “not so interested” group of people, but they still skim over it. One of those people decides to broadcast that information, which then creates a domino effect. It is similar to celebrities no longer using publicist but their twitter feeds,

ASSUMPTIONS:

A) It’s cheap
B) It’s unedited
C) More people will pay attention to it if their a humanistic quality (you feel personal closer to the users)
Another analysis I tried – Google – Tea Party – 35.1 million hits today

In last week’s travelogue I discussed the term Digital Native.  This term sparked my attention during my research. I have also tagged it onto our blog. So what does it mean?

Some Digital Natives are deeply affiliated with all sorts of interests that bring them together organically: Piracy groups, massively multiplayer online games, open source software development, cracking encryption, etc. Others become deeply interested in movements such as Anonymous, the RBN (Russian Business Network), or even terrorist organizations.

A Digital Native as an online footprint or citizenship in the internet realm as well as the physical world.

I bring this up mainly because people tend to collaborate online more, and in much larger numbers because of the anonymity that is involved. People will voice their opinions and be free.

Currently the predominate view of the Tea Party is:

Within the Tea Party, there are separate factions with separate goals. Some activists want the various parties to coalesce into a single organization, while others want to keep it a grass-roots movement with no leader. via CNN

The idea of no leadership goes back to the “Hive Mind” or collective aspect of these group. Internet technology enables this structure to exist so no formal leadership is not required.

In this case of the Iranian so called “Green” Twitter Revolution, a repressed country such as Iran, uses only these sorts of outlets to get their messages across. Iranian’s used different tactics that the Tea Party because they had to keep their identities hidden.  No formal leadership is established on the net for the Iranian activists. It is a cause that keeps them unified. The following are list of general tactics used during the June Elections in Tehran.

1. Tactic #1 – Change your time zone on twitter, and retweet all the information coming your way.

2. Tactic #2 – Change your name on FB, Twitter, A study by social media analytics companySysomos shows that of 65 million population, there are only 19,235 Twitter users who disclose their location as Iran. DdOS Attacks, etc.
3. Tactic #3 – Create Green photo of yourself
4. Tactic #4 – Upload videos/photos – repost, retweet and let it spread…

Now these are only a few strategies.

The Tea Party doesn’t have to be concerned with concealing their identities. They protest freely in the streets without worry of being photographed. What are some of the tactics they use? In the case of twitter, they are not on a centralized network because there are many Tea Parties depending upon the region you live in. Fundamentally, they can be categorized as a distributed network.

  • You Tube
  • Facebook – Mainly Fan Pages
  • Their Own Websites
  • Twitter Feeds
  • Tea Party Twitter Feeds:

#3PP Third Party Pledge http://www.thirdpartypledge.org
#73Wire 73 Wire http://73wire.com
This is the Conservative Version of the Huff Post.
#912C 912 Coalition http://site.the912coalition.or
#AFFT Americans for Fair Tax http://www.fairtax.org

The 2008 Obama Campaign:

The Presidential campaign encompassed many different tools via the internet. The You Tube debate was very popular, by having ordinary citizens post their questions online via video for the candidates to answer.

Democratic Party candidate Barack Obama created a broad grassroots movement and a new method of campaigning by courting and mobilizing activists, donations, and voters through the Internet. It was part of a campaign that mobilized grassroots workers in every state. Obama also set fundraising records in more than one month by gaining support from a record-breaking number of individual small donors.

Research

In my concluding post I wanted to compare twitter statistics between the 3 online movements I had brought up previously.

The first image below compares twitter statistics between Tea Party Patriots (TPPatriots) and IranElection. The Tea Party Movement has been around a lot longer than what up roar of the Iran Election and yet the Tea Party Patriots have over 2000 followers this week. 800 more than I had reported last week.

The next graph depicts teapartynews  – What I would like you to look at is the progression that is occurring here. In the previous example for the Iranian Elections, the graphic is pretty static and not much movement is occurring. In the graph below there is an upward climb everyday.

In the concluding graph I have compared the President Obama’s Twitter Account with Iran Election. The purpose of this graph is to portray the fact that in respect to the Tea Party, Iran Election, and any other online movements, the President of the United States does have the political lead in respect to the Internet.

In conclusion I believe the mainstream influence and propaganda being used in this movement is completely artificial based the on the stats I have provided in the charts below. It is very hard to gauge where this movement is headed, mainly because they are so many small individual groups separated by regions, causes and mainly the opinions of people. I do not believe that this is a unified movement in any case, and the exploitation of it has only been provided by Fox News in order to create a negative light towards the democrats and President Obama.

For those of you who may be interested this is the Tea Party Map which I located on Michelle Malkin’s Blog. This image is for the 3000 parties which were hosted last July. You can see the updated Google map HERE.

And to conclude: An interesting video I found:

Tea Party \”A Laugh\”