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Steve Jobs: Not Sexy?

So I had already posted on the topics I was considering for my next travelogue. Well, I have another one. Apple banning “sexy” apps from its App Store, or as ABC News calls Porn Purge. Well, there seems to a lot of controversy around it. Can Apple do this? While we know Apple has been known to be a overly protective of their products, is this being too controlling? What defines apps that can be banned and not banned. Unfortunately, I am a Android phone owner and will not be able to conduct this journey first-handed by trying different things myself. However, I hope to tackle this from an investigative journalism type of travelogue. Sort of trying it in a way Alexandra did with Gawker Stalker. I plan on looking at what apps have been banned and why some like Sports Illustrated Swimsuit have not been banned. Some people (and the media) can become a bit enamored with Apple sometimes. I am leaning on the side of thinking they are being business-like and evil in a way. Could they be allowing certain “sexy” apps based on who made them? As in they cannot dare to fight with the Big Boys and corporations and banning their apps, but can afford to squash the weaker (and perhaps correctly more perverted) laymen? Let’s find out!

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4 Comments

  1. Harris 13:10, Feb 23rd, 10

    So have you found any Android applications that you can use but their Apple version has been banned?
    I’d really want to see some examples of what Apple finds ‘too sexy for my phone’.

  2. Alexandra 13:34, Feb 23rd, 10

    Glad I inspired you :) I’m interested to find out what, if any, the criteria are for being banned. Does the first amendment come into this in some way?

  3. Leslie 15:34, Feb 23rd, 10

    I actually just read this in NY Magazine today: http://nymag.com/daily/intel/2010/02/apple_turns_into_bikini_police.html?mid=daily-intel–20100223 Should be an interesting topic to explore!

  4. mushon 10:09, Feb 27th, 10

    It’s also important to try to understand what is Apple hoping to acheive or to prevent through this censorship. What is that thing that they fear? Indeed I agree with Harris that it will be useful to try to answer this question by comparing it to the Android application market and what type of environment or app culture does this openness allow.