Was browsing through the apps on iTunes store to see which one is interesting to download and came across this app called “Go Try It On“. The app basically give people honest advise on your look before you go out! Users can get an opinion or give an opinion, while you’re on the go. You can get feedback on your outfit from the app community in real time, or keep your outfit private and only get advice from people you know. The concept for the app is to have people receiving opinions on their outfit before purchasing or going out in instant. Of course from application such as this, where users share their outfit to potentially a huge community, there are rules and standards. From the “Go Try It On” website, they have a list of community standards, some rules include moderate your content, no nudity, etc. With a quick look on the website at www.gotryiton.com it seems like most users are female, and so far I haven’t seen any comments that are hurtful. I’m interesting in seeing what goes on in the community and what sort of comments people are giving.
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There may have not been Facebook in the 1970s, but the human concern for privacy is timeless. In 1974, Columbia University professor Alan Westin conducted surveys about privacy and concluded with the result that most participants were privacy fundamentalists (those with high concerns) or privacy pragmatists (those with medium concerns). Now, put internet in the picture. Privacy and the internet don’t really go hand in hand. People will tell you cautionary tales about that – “once it’s on the internet…!” Yup, you’ve heard the horror stories. No, really, if you don’t want to share certain information, DON’T SHARE IT.

As you may have noticed, Facebook constantly changes its privacy policy. But what exactly are some of the changes? It seems that when a layout change occurs, people pay attention and give their time of day to explore the new settings, but notifications about new privacy policies aren’t given too much thought. When Facebook started out, your information was viewable by friends and people in your network (such as a school network).We observed the transformations across the years on this timeline. Facebook started in 2005 with the policy that “No personal information that you submit to The Facebook will be available to any user of the Web Site who does not belong to at least one of the groups specified by you in your privacy settings.” Five years later (by April 2010), it’s become “When you connect with an application or website it will have access to General Information about you. The term General Information includes your and your friends’ names, profile pictures, gender, user IDs, connections, and any content shared using the Everyone privacy setting. …” and ended on the note that “If you are uncomfortable with the connection being publicly available, you should consider removing (or not making) the connection.” There goes your privacy! Read the rest of this entry »

Privacy and the internet don’t really go hand in hand. People will tell you cautionary tales about that – “once it’s on the internet…!” Yup, you’ve heard the horror stories.

As you may have noticed, Facebook constantly changes its privacy policy. But what exactly are some of the changes? It seems that when a layout change occurs, people pay attention and give their time of day to explore the new settings, but notifications about new privacy policies aren’t given too much thought. When Facebook started out, your information was viewable by friends and people in your network (such as a school network). We observed the transformations across the years on this timeline. Facebook started in 2005 with the policy that “No personal information that you submit to The Facebook will be available to any user of the Web Site who does not belong to at least one of the groups specified by you in your privacy settings.” Five years later (by April 2010), it’s become “When you connect with an application or website it will have access to General Information about you. The term General Information includes your and your friends’ names, profile pictures, gender, user IDs, connections, and any content shared using the Everyone privacy setting. …” and ended on the note that “If you are uncomfortable with the connection being publicly available, you should consider removing (or not making) the connection.” Oof, there goes your privacy!

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Every time Facebook changes the layout of profiles or edits the way the newsfeed works, users get up in arms. People do not like change, especially when it comes to their favorite social networking site. They take to their pages with fury to yell at Mark Zuckerburg and the rest of the Facebook team to leave Facebook the way it is. When Facebook updates its privacy policies and offers users new steps to secure their pages, no one comments and many ignore the window explaining the changes that pops up after they log in. A few years ago, privacy notifications elicited more a reaction. When social networking first became a phenomenon with sites like Myspace and Livejournal, the media was constantly discussing the issue of how people’s privacy was now at risk. Users did not trust social networking sites to protect their identities, and so were cautious and constantly warning each other with horror stories of Myspace pages gone awry. With the development of Facebook however, public opinion about social networking security seems to be changing. Read the rest of this entry »

In the reading “Blog Theory,” Jodi Dean discusses how “the essence of the blog is the post.” A post is what constitutes the fundamentality of a blog, living on even after the blogger stops blogging. Anything can be included in a blog post and be represented “in moments as an image, reaction, feeling, or event.” But despite its obvious ubiquity, what makes people actually want to read a blog, be it personal or professional? How does a blog gather a community of interacting readers? Read the rest of this entry »

Aside from doing manual research about Groupon over the past week and a half, it seems like the company is doing its best to come to me. Every day when I open up my email, I get a new message from Groupon telling me what the latest deal of the day is in New York City. The letter is very helpful in determining if I want to vote on this deal or not. It tells me all about the company, its locations, and even gives me a few more deals with an urgency that lets me know I only have 1 day left to buy it (!!!). It got me thinking, are Groupon’s jam-packed-with-info messages just a reminder of which deals are available, or overcompensation for something else? Read the rest of this entry »